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Gemstones: Turquoise

Turquoise
Turquoise


Turquoise
Turquoise


Turquoise
Turquoise

Turquoise brings happiness and good fortune.

Color: The color of turquoise ranges from sky blue through various shades of green to greenish and yellowish gray. Turquoise is opaque except in the thinnest splinters, and has a feeble, faintly waxy lustre.

Description: Turquoise, hydrated copper and aluminum phosphate [CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8*4H2O], that is extensively used as a gemstone. Turquoise is a secondary mineral deposited from circulating waters, and it occurs chiefly as an opaque, granular vein running through a host rock.

The name's origin: The name turquoise undoubtedly comes from turc (Turkish in French) as it was transported to Europe through Turkey.

Birthstone: Turquoise along with zircon are birthstones of Sagittarius (Archer): Nov. 22-Dec. 21.

Wedding anniversary: Turquoise is the anniversary gemstone for the 5th year of marriage.

Care and treatment: The stone's color and lustre tend to deteriorate with exposure to sunlight, heat, or various weak acids. Avoid hot water and household chemicals. Turquoise is relatively soft so avoid scratches and sharp blows. Make sure certain coatings are not removed.

From the stone history: Turquoise with its blue hue, is among the oldest known gemstones. Turquoise was obtained from the Sinai Peninsula before the 4th millennium BC in one of the world's first important hard-rock mining operations. Turquoise started being used before 4000 BC.
Turquoise was an important ornamental mineral for jewelry and other object by the ancient Egyptians. It graced the necks of Egyptian Pharaohs and adorned the ceremonial dress of early native Americans. Turquoise has been attributed with healing powers as well as promoting the wearer's status and wealth. A very special stone indeed, Turquoise is a sacred stone to many American Indian tribes and has been used in various jewelry items.

Shopping guide: Given as a gift, Turquoise is believed by many to bestow wealth and happiness upon its receiver.
Turquoise is reasonably priced and quite lovely. The finest stone is an even blue, blue-green, or green color with little or no mottling. Delicate veining, caused by impurities, is desired by some collectors as proof of a natural stone.
A delicate sky blue, turquoise provides an attractive contrast with precious metals. It may be carved or engraved, and irregular pieces are often set in mosaics with jasper, obsidian, and mother of pearl.

Healing ability: Turquoise is said to be a guard against all diseases. It assist in tissue regeneration, subtle body alignment & strengthening.

Mystical power: Turquoise has been thought to warn the wearer of danger or illness by changing color. In the 13th century,turquoise was thought to protect the wearer from falling, especially from horses.
Turquoise is also believed to bring happiness and good fortune to all. It's said that turquoise attracts healing spirits, making it a premier healing stone.
Believed to be a protective stone, turquoise is worn to guard against violence and accidents. Turquoise is also a valuable amulet for travelers.

Deposits: Highly prized turquoise has come from Neyshabur, Iran. Numerous deposits in the southwestern United States have been worked for centuries by American Indians. Turquoise also occurs in northern Africa, Australia, Siberia, and Europe.

See also: using of Turquoise

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